Council tax

​Council tax is payable by residents as a way of contributing to local services. Most homes are subject to council tax and the bill is calculated using the value of the property at April 1 1991.

The amount you pay depends on the valuation band of your property. There are eight valuation bands based on the value of properties in 1991. They range from Band A for properties worth up to £40,000 to Band H for people living in homes worth over £320,000. The bands and value of properties is determined by the Government's Valuation Officer. 
 
If you have recently moved house or if you are new to the borough you should let us know immediately by completing the report a change of address online form.  
  • Appeals
     
    You may be able to appeal against your valuation band if:
    • You moved into your home in the last six months and the building has been altered since the 1991 valuation or
    • The area where you live has changed in a way which could affect the value of your home.
     
    For more information contact the Valuation Office Agency.
     
    You can also appeal if you have been refused a discount, exemption or relief or if you don't think you should be paying council tax. If you wish to appeal on these grounds contact us.
     
    If you decide to appeal you must continue paying your council tax. We will adjust your future payments or refund any amounts you have overpaid if your appeal is successful.
  • Discounts and premiums 

    The following information is intended as guidance only and is not a full statement of the law.

    There are various discounts that you may be able to claim to reduce your bill. If you claim a discount and your circumstances change you must let us know within 21 days of the change or face a penalty.
     

    Discounts


    Single occupier discount 
    The full council tax bill assumes that there are two adults living in a property. If only one adult lives there as their main home, the bill will be reduced by 25%.

    You can apply for this discount using our 'Single occupier discount form'.

    Empty homes 

    Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished 0 – 6 months
    A discount of 50% applies 
    where a property is empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) and runs from the date that the furniture is removed. Discount ends after a six month period or earlier if furniture is placed in the property. If an empty home becomes occupied, or furnished, for a period of less than six weeks and then falls empty again, it will only resume a 50% discount if there is any of the original six months discount period remaining. Occupation of an empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) home for less than six weeks does not give rise to a new discount period.

    Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished 6 – 24 months
    A discount of 25% applies where a property is empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) and has been for a period of 6-24 months.
    If the property has been empty and unfurnished before you bought or rented it we may not be able to award you the maximum empty discount of 50%. This is because the level of discount granted is based on the length of time that the property has been empty and unfurnished regardless of who the liable person is.


    Long-term empty homes premium
    From 1 April 2013 local authorities have the discretion to charge an additional premium on top of a full liability for long-term empty properties.

    A ‘long-term empty’ home is a property that has been unoccupied and substantially unfurnished for at least 24 months. 

    The premium can be an additional charge of up to 50% of the full liability; Chorley Council, however, has decided to set the premium at 25% so the full charge for a long-term empty home will be 125%.

    The reasons for this are that it generates additional revenue for the council and it discourages home owners from leaving properties empty and unfurnished for a long time.

    From 1 April 2013, if your property has been unfurnished and unoccupied for 24 months, you will be charged a bill of 125%.

    Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished homes undergoing “major repair work” or “structural alteration”
    A discount of 50% applies where a property is empty, unoccupied and substantially unfurnished and needs major repair works before anyone can live there. It includes homes which are currently undergoing this work. This discount can apply for a maximum of 12 months. To apply download the major repair work application form.

    Second homes and empty, unoccupied but furnished homes
    From 1 April 2013 there is no longer a discount available for these properties.

    Disabled relief 
    If you or someone who lives with you needs a room, additional bathroom or kitchen or space for a wheelchair because of a disability, you may be entitled to have your bill reduced to the level of the next lowest band, or 1/9th if already a band A property.

    You can apply for this relief using our 'Disabled relief application form'.

    Other discounts
    Certain people are not counted as 'paying adults' and therefore a discount may be available if only one adult in the property is counted. These are:
    • School or college leavers who are under the age of 20 and left school or college on or after 1 May
    • Apprentices employed for the purposes of learning a trade, business, profession, office, employment or
    vocation, undertaking a programme of training leading to an accredited qualification. Their salary must be no
    more than £195.00 per week before any deductions for income tax and national insurance
    • People who are a patient in hospital, which is their only or main home
    • People living in care homes (receiving care) as their only or main home
    • Full-time students and student nurses - a full time course requires attendance for at least 24 weeks with at
    least 21 hours of study per week.
    • Students under 20 on a qualifying course at or below the following standards:
       a) A level
       b) Higher Scottish certificate of education
       c) National certificate of the Scottish vocational educational council
       d) Scottish vocational qualification level III
    The course must last for more than 3 calendar months with more than 12 hours of study per week. Tuition is usually carried out between 8am and 5.30pm.
     
    People who are severely mentally impaired and are entitled to or in receipt of one of the following benefits:

       • Incapacity benefit
       • Employment and support allowance
       • Attendance allowance
       • Severe disablement allowance
       • Highest or middle rate care component of disability living allowance
       • An increase in disablement pension for constant attendance
       • Disability element of working tax credit
       • Unemployability supplement
       • Constant attendance allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
       • Unemployablilty allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
       • Income support, which includes a disability premium because of incapacity for work
       • Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - Standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component

    • Care workers working for low pay, usually for charities and providing care for at least 24 hours a week
    • People caring for someone in their home with a disability who is not their spouse, partner or child under 18
    They must provide care for at least 35 hours a week and the person they are caring for must be in receipt of one of the following benefits: 
       • Higher rate of attendance allowance
       • Lower rate of Attendance Allowance
       • Highest rate care component of disability living allowance
       • Middle rate care component of disibility living allowance
       • An increase in constant attendance allowance under the industrial injuries or war pension scheme
       • Highest rate of constant attendance allowance payable on top of full rate disablement benefit paid for an           
          industrial injury
       • The standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component of PIP

    People staying in certain hostels or night shelters 
    • Members of visiting forces and certain international institutions 
    • Members of religious communities, for example monks and nuns 
    • People in prison, except those in prison for non-payment of council tax or fines 

    Annexes
    From 1 April 2014 a discount of 50% has been introduced for annexes which are:

    1. occupied by a relative of the person liable to pay the council tax of the main dwelling; or
    2. ‘unoccupied’ as the person living in the main dwelling is using the annex as part of their main home

    Please note you may be able to claim an exemption if the annex is:

    1. occupied by a dependant relative; or
    2. unoccupied and cannot be let separately from the main dwelling without a breach of planning control

    Please contact us for further information and to apply.

  • Exemptions

    The following information is intended as guidance only and is not a full statement of the law.

    There are various exemptions that you may be able to claim to reduce your bill. If you claim an exemption and your circumstances change you must let us know within 21 days of the change or face a penalty.

    Information about the various exemption classes is show below:
    A - Empty and requiring or undergoing major repairs or structural alterations
    From 1 April 2013 this exemption has been abolished.


    B - Unoccupied, owned by a charity
    An unoccupied property owned by a charity and last used by the charity in connection with its charitable objectives. This exemption can only apply for a maximum of six months provided the charity retain ownership and the dwelling remains unoccupied.

    C - Empty and unfurnished
    From 1 April 2013 this exemption has been abolished.

    D - Empty due to a person being in prison
    An unoccupied property where the person who would be liable to council tax is in prison or some other place of detention is exempt, except where the person is in prison for non-payment of the council tax or a fine.

    E - Empty due to a person having gone to live in hospital or a care home
    An unoccupied property where the person who would be liable to council tax has left in order to live in a hospital, residential care home or hostel, where the person is receiving care or treatment is exempt. The exemption applies where the person has their sole or main residence in a hospital or care home etc.

    F - Council Tax payer deceased
    An unoccupied property is exempt if the person who was liable to council tax has died, the property has remained unoccupied since the date of death and probate has not been granted. The exemption continues for six months after the grant of probate or after the letters of administration have been made.

    G - Occupation prohibited by law
    A property is exempt if its occupation is forbidden by law or if it is kept unoccupied because of impending compulsory purchase.

    H - Unoccupied dwelling held for a Minister of Religion
    Vicarages and similar properties which are awaiting occupation by a minister of religion from where they will perform their duties.

    I - Person living elsewhere to receive personal care
    Properties where a person has gone to live with someone else in order to receive care. The relevant absentee must be receiving care due to old age, disablement, illness, past or present alcohol or drug dependence, or past or present mental disorder. The unoccupied property must previously have been the sole or main residence of the absent person.

    J - Dwelling left empty by a person providing personal care
    This exemption applies where the owner or tenant has left a property unoccupied, having changed their place of residence in order to provide care for someone else. The same conditions with regard to the reasons for the need for care apply as in Class I. The relevant absentee must have been away for this reason since they left.

    K - Dwelling left empty by a student
    Where a student is the owner of an unoccupied property it is exempt provided that when it was last occupied it was the sole or main residence of that student, and that no one else, other than students, lived there.

    L - Unoccupied repossessed dwelling
    An unoccupied  property due to a mortgage lender (bank, building society or finance company) taking possession, usually because a borrower has failed to keep up mortgage repayments.

    M - Halls of Residence
    Halls of residence for students are exempt provided the accommodation is owned or managed by a prescribed educational establishment. The accommodation must be provided mainly for students, which does not prevent part being used to accommodate staff or other persons.

    N - Dwellings occupied only by students or relevant persons
    Any property which is occupied only by students and/or school or college leavers and/or student's spouse or dependant who is not a British citizen and cannot legally work or claim benefits, is exempt. Should the students, or relevant persons, leave the property unoccupied during school/college holidays the exemption will continue if the students, or relevant persons, retain the right to occupy and has the intention to use the dwelling as term time accommodation

    O - Armed Forces Accommodation (UK Forces)
    Living accommodation for UK armed forces which is owned by the Secretary of State for Defence is exempt whether occupied or not. This includes barracks and other accommodation on military bases, together with married quarters and any other property, wherever located, provided the accommodation is held for the purposes of forces accommodation. Contributions in lieu of council tax are payable to Local Authorities on such properties.

    P - Members and Dependants of Visiting Forces
    A property is exempt if at least one person who would be liable is a member (or dependant) of a visiting force and is neither a British citizen nor usually resident in the UK. A property is exempt under this category even if not all the liable persons are associated with a visiting force. For example, a property in which the liable persons are a visiting serviceman and his British wife would be exempt.

    The nations whose forces are covered by the Act include:
    Antigua, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, Fiji, France, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, India, Italy, Jamaica, Malta, Norway, St Lucia, Spain, Tonga and Turkey.

    Q - Unoccupied dwelling held by a trustee in bankruptcy
    Where the person who would be liable to the council tax in respect of an unoccupied property is a trustee in bankruptcy, the property is exempt. The exemption applies whether the unoccupied property is furnished or not.

    R - Caravan Pitches and Boat Moorings
    A caravan pitch or a boat mooring will constitute a 'dwelling' for council tax purposes if its next use is likely to be domestic. A pitch, which is not occupied by a caravan, or a mooring which is not occupied by a boat, is exempt for the whole of any period during which this situation exists
     
    S - All Occupiers under 18
    A property occupied only by a person or persons aged under 18 is exempt.
     

    T - Unoccupied Annex
    Where an unoccupied property forms part of a single property which includes another dwelling (for example an annex/granny flat) and cannot be let separately from that other dwelling without a breach of planning control. See also Class W.

    U - Dwellings occupied only by Severely Mentally Impaired
    This applies to properties that are only occupied by a person or persons who are severely mentally impaired as defined for the purposes of council tax discount and who are entitled to or in receipt of one of the following benefits:

    Incapacity benefit
    Employment and support allowance
    Attendance allowance
    Severe disablement allowance
    Highest or middle rate care component of disability living allowance
    An increase in disablement pension for constant attendance
    Disability element of working tax credit
    Unemployability supplement
    Constant attendance allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
    Unemployablilty allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
    Income support, which includes a disability premium because of incapacity for work
    • Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - Standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component

     
    A dwelling is also exempt if it is only occupied by:
    • Severely mentally impaired person or persons
    • Students or relevant persons (for the purpose of the student exemption see Class N) 

     You can apply for this exemption by using the Council tax severe mental impairment discount application form.

    V - Occupied by a Diplomat
    A property will be exempt from council tax if at least one person is either:
    1. A person to whom privileges and immunities are conferred by the Diplomatic Privileges Act 1964; or
    2. A person on whom privileges and immunities are conferred under paragraph 5 (1) Part II of the Schedule to the Commonwealth Secretariat Act 1966; or
    3. A person on whom privileges and immunities are conferred by section 1 of the Consular Relations Act 1968.

    And is not either:
    1. A British citizen, a British dependent Territories citizen, a British National (Overseas) or a British Overseas citizen; or
    2. A person who under British Nationality Act 1981 is a British subject; or
    3. A British protected person; or
    4. A permanent resident of the United Kingdom.

    There must be no other property in the United Kingdom, which is the main residence of that person, or is the main residence within the United Kingdom of that person

    W - Occupied by a Dependant Relative
    A property that forms part of a single property which includes another dwelling (for example an annex/granny flat) where a dependant relative lives. For the purpose of Class W a relative shall be regarded as dependant if they are either:
    1. Aged 65 years or more
    2. Severely mentally impaired within the meaning given in paragraph 2 of Schedule 1 to the Act; or
    3. Substantially and permanently disabled (whether by illness, injury, congenital deformity or otherwise)

    A relative is defined as:
    1. The spouse of that person; or
    2. The person's parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece or is the parent or child or such a person, and
    i. relationship by marriage shall be treated as a relationship by blood
    ii. a relationship between a man and a woman living together as husband and wife shall be treated as a relationship by marriage
    iii. a civil partnership, and
    iiii. The stepchild of a person shall be treated as his child

    See also Class T


    Please note a change in ownership of the property does not entitle the property to a further period of exemption If you think you qualify for an exemption or need more information contact us.

     

  • How to pay

    Direct debit
    Direct debit is the most efficient way to pay. You can pay by instalments over 10 or 12 months with a choice of payment dates, the 1st, 15th or 28th of each month. 

    Why pay by direct debit?
    • You have a choice of payment date
    • You don't have to remember to pay on the due date
    • You only need to sign one instruction unlike standing order, which must be renewed each year
    • No more cheques to write or letters to post
    • No more queuing to pay
    • Your bank or building society will make an immediate refund if any payment breaks the terms of your instruction
    • You can cancel the instruction at any time just by contacting your bank/building society

    You can set up a direct debit online or telephone us. 

    Online
    You will need to have your debit or credit card and your council tax account reference number to hand, you can find the number on your bill.

     
    We accept Switch, Visa, Mastercard, Maestro, Delta, Solo, JCB and Visa Purchasing.
     
    By telephone
    You can pay 24/7 by credit or debit card through our automated telephone payments system. Call 01257 511000 and quote your account reference number from your bill and your card details.
     
    If your reference number contains the letter X, when you are asked to key in your account reference number please replace the X with the * on your telephone keypad.
     
    At any Post Office or PayPoint outlet
    You can make your payment at Post Office and PayPoint outlets. Please take your bill with a barcode on the front when making payment and allow three working days for payment to reach your account.
     
    Through your bank/online banking
    You can arrange payment through your bank by quoting:
     
    A/C Name: Chorley Borough Council Collections Account
    Sort Code: 20-69-85
    A/C No: 63417069
    Account Branch Details: 23 Market Street, Chorley, Lancashire, PR7 2SY

    Please remember to quote your council tax account reference number with all payments and ensure that payment reaches us by the due date on your bill. 
  • Important changes for annexes from 1 April 2014

    From 1 April 2014 a discount of 50% has been introduced for annexes which are:

    1. occupied by a relative of the person liable to pay the council tax of the main dwelling; or
    2. ‘unoccupied’ as the person living in the main dwelling is using the annex as part of their main home

    Please note you may be able to claim an exemption if the annex is:

    1. occupied by a dependant relative; or
    2. unoccupied and cannot be let separately from the main dwelling without a breach of planning control

    Please contact us for further information and to apply.

  • Problems paying your bill?

    You must pay your council tax on time as shown on your bill. If you do not, we will send you a reminder. If your payments are not kept up to date following a reminder, you may receive a court summons for the total amount you owe. This means you will have significant court costs to pay.

    What if I can’t afford to pay?
    If you can’t afford to pay your bill, please contact us. Also see if you are entitled to any discounts or exemptions to reduce your bill. 

    The Citizens Advice Bureau provides a free and independent housing and debt counselling service

    What do I need to do if I’ve received a summons?
    If you receive a summons, please pay your account and court costs in full before the court date or contact us if you wish to discuss your account and make a payment arrangement.

    What happens if I still don't pay?
    If your account remains unpaid and your case reaches court, we will ask the court to grant a liability order against you and will apply for additional liability order costs.

    Once we have obtained an order from the court, it has the authority to take the following recovery actions:
    • Refer your case to a certificated bailiff
    • Set up an attachment from your earnings if you're working
    • Set up a deduction from income support or employment and support allowance if you're not working
    • Apply for your committal to prison
    • Apply for you to be made bankrupt or make a charging order on your property

    If you have been issued with a summons the following information tells you what happens next.
    How can I stop the proceedings?
    By making a full payment of the council tax & costs shown on the summons before the hearing date. You can send your payment to PO Box 13, Chorley, PR7 1AR using the slip provided at the bottom of the summons or you can pay by telephone 24hours a day, 7 days a week using a debit or credit card on 01257 511000. If you do this the case will not be put to the Magistrates and no further costs will be added.

    What if I can't pay in full?
    Council tax staff will be happy to discuss payment with you at any time before the hearing and they may allow you time to pay depending on your circumstances. Please call the number shown on your summons to discuss payment.
    A free, impartial debt counselling service is also provided by the Citizens Advice Bureau.

    Will I still have to pay additional costs if I make an arrangement to pay before the hearing?
    Yes. We will apply for a liability order as explained  under 'What Will Happen At The Hearing' and costs will be added to your liability. However, we will take no further recovery action provided you make payment as we have agreed.

    What if I have written to you about my summons and not had a reply by the hearing date?
    We make every effort to answer letters before the hearing but this is not always possible. Even if you have written to us about your summons, we will still apply for a liability order for any amount left unpaid at the date of the hearing.

    Do I need to attend court?
    No. Only if you wish to appear in court and put forward a defence against the summons. One valid defence is that you have already paid the amount shown on the summons. If you paid before the summons was issued, please tell us so that we can trace your payment and cancel the proceedings. Please note that many enquires can be resolved prior to the hearing date. Please contact us if you require any other information.

    What will happen at the hearing?
    If you have not paid your summons in full, including the costs, we will ask the Magistrates to grant a 'Liability Order' for the amount unpaid plus further costs. This Liability Order allows us to take further action to recover the unpaid balance including the extra costs. After the hearing, we will send you a letter telling you what will happen next and how to avoid further action.

    Will the Magistrates decide how much I can pay?
    No. The Magistrates will only decide whether or not to grant a Liability Order.

    What if I have any other queries?
    Please do not write to the Court. Contact us and we will be able to help you with any questions you may have.

    If you have been issued with a committal summons the following information tells you what happens next:

    How can I stop the committal proceedings?
    By paying the balance shown on the committal summons in full before the hearing date. You can send your payment to Chorley Council, Union Street, Chorley, PR7 1AL using the slip provided at the bottom of the summons or you can pay by telephone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using a debit or credit card on 01257 511000. If you do this, the case will not be put to the Magistrates and you will not incur any further costs.

    What if I can't pay in full?
    We will be happy to discuss payment with you at any time before the committal hearing and they may allow you time to pay depending on your circumstances. Please call the number shown on your summons to discuss payment.
    The Citizens Advice Bureau also provides a free, impartial debt counselling service.

    What happens if I make an arrangement to pay before the hearing?
    You will not need to attend the hearing. The case will be adjourned and your payments will be monitored. No further action will be taken provided you make payment as agreed.

    What if I have written to you about my committal summons and not had a reply by the hearing date?
    We make every effort to answer letters before the hearing, but this is not always possible. If you have not received a reply, you should then, attend court.

    Do I need to attend court for a committal summons hearing?
    Yes. It is only if you have paid in full or made a satisfactory payment arrangement that you don't need to attend.

    What will happen at the committal hearing?
    Our recovery officer may see you prior to the committal hearing.
    Alternatively, you may appear before the Magistrates who will enquire as to your means and conduct. They will then decide whether your failure to pay was due to wilful refusal or culpable neglect and, if so, whether you should be committed to prison.

    Will the Magistrates decide how much I can pay?
    If the Magistrates decide to allow you to make a payment arrangement, then they will decide how much you should pay.

    What if I have any other queries?
    Please do not write to the Court. Contact us and we will be able to help you with any questions you may have.

  • View your council tax details online using our e-Citizen service

    If you are an e-Citizen customer you can sign up to paperless billing and view your council tax details online.

    The following details are available:
    • The balance on your account
    • Payments you have made
    • Correspondence we have sent to you

    You can also set up a direct debit and find the council tax band for properties in Chorley.

    You will need to create an e-Citizen user name and password to be able to access your details. To do this use the view your council tax details online (e-citizen) link then click on the Register Now button.  
  • FAQs

    Has my bill increased?
    On average the total payable amount in comparison to last year has increased by 1.7%.

    Chorley Council’s & Lancashire Combined Fire Authority’s elements of the bill have remained the same as last year.

    Lancashire County Council’ part of the bill has increased by 2%.
     
    Police & Crime Commissioner for Lancashire’s part of the bill has increased by 2%.

    What are special expenses?
    People living in some parishes pay special expenses to Chorley Council for grass cutting and maintenance of open spaces. The amount paid depends on the amount to maintain the area in each parish.

    Where does my Council Tax money go?
    The make up of the average band D Council Tax, excluding special expenses, is as follows: -
    75%   Lancashire County Council
    11%  Chorley Council
    10%  Lancashire Police Authority
    4%  Lancashire Combined Fire Authority

    Lancashire County Council's services include:
    • Education
    • Social Services
    • Highways
    • Libraries
    • Recreation
    • Tourism

    Chorley Council's services include:
    • Community safety - we now help to fund 27 PCSO's in Chorley
    • Maintaining parks and open spaces –new play area installed at Yarrow valley
    • Emptying your bins – Chorley has one of the best recycling rates in Lancashire
    • Street cleaning – residential streets are swept every 8 weeks and A roads every 3 weeks
    • Environmental health – the food hygiene rating system makes it easier for you to check food safety standards and make informed choices on where to eat
    • Licensing – ensuring pubs & off licences sell alcohol responsibly
    • Neighbourhood officers – tackle issues such as dog fouling and animal welfare
    • Economic regeneration – Grants to help start and grow your business. Attracting new business to Chorley. Town centre and markets management
    • Leisure centres – we have three facilities across the borough to help people stay healthy
    • Housing – helping first time buyers get on the property ladder
    • Planning and building control – we offer services to residents for new developments
    • Voluntary sector support – grants available to local community groups

    I paid by direct debit last year - do I need to set this up again?
    As direct debit continues year on year, until either the bank or the customer cancels the instruction, it should still be in place.

    At the foot of the bill why does it show ‘In addition to this bill you have other balances of £***.**’ when I paid in full last year? 
    Whilst the bills are dated 14 March 2014 the information on the bills was gathered on 28 February 2014. If a payment was made after this date it will not be reflected on the 2014/2015 bill.

    Why have you sent a bill to my old address when I have told you that I have moved?
    Whilst the bills are dated 14 March 2014 the information on the bills was gathered on 28 February 2014. At this point your change of address had not been received/dealt with.

    What can I do if I think my property is in the wrong band?
    Council tax valuation bands are allocated by the Valuation Office Agency and are based on the amount a property would have been sold for on 1 April 1991.

    You can appeal against your band by contacting the Valuation Office Agency.

    Why is a bar code shown on my bill?
    A barcode is printed on your bill to be used when making a payment at a Post Office or PayPoint outlet.

    What if I have lost my bill?
    If you misplace your bill please contact us.

    I have just bought or rented a property and have not moved in yet. Why am I only receiving a 25% discount?
    If the property has been empty and unfurnished before you bought or rented it we may not be able to award you the maximum empty discount of 50%. This is because the level of discount granted is based on the length of time that the property has been empty and unfurnished regardless of who the liable person is.

    Why am I being charged 125%? What is this premium on my bill?
    From 1 April 2013 local authorities have the discretion to charge an additional premium on top of a full liability for long-term empty properties.

    This premium can be up to 50% charged in addition to the normal full liability; Chorley Council, however, has decided to set the premium at 25% so the full charge will be 125%.

    A ‘long-term empty’ property is one that has been unoccupied and substantially unfurnished for at least 24 months.

    The reasons for this are that it generates additional revenue for the council and it discourages home owners from leaving properties empty and unfurnished for a long time.

    From 1 April 2013, if your property has been unfurnished and unoccupied for 24 months, you will be charged a bill of 125%.
     

    I think I have been given the wrong discount – how can I appeal?
    Put your appeal in writing to us giving as much information as you can as to why you think the discount is wrong and we will contact you.